Air Quality Information

Today's Forecast

Air Quality Index (AQI)

44

Air Quality

Good

Highest Pollutant

Fine Particles

Past 24 Hours

AQI

56

Air Quality

Moderate

Highest Pollutant

Ozone

Secondary Pollutant

Fine Particles

Pollen

Poplar, Hickory, Pear, Birch, Oak, Cedar

Mold

Cladosporium, Alternaria, Drechslera, Periconia

Details for the Last 24 Hours

Fine Particles (PM2.5): 14.7  µg/m3

Ozone (8-hour standard): 52 ppb

Pollen Count: 103 (High) - Poplar, Hickory, Pear, Birch, Oak, Cedar

Mold Spore Count: 444 (Low) - Cladosporium, Alternaria, Drechslera, Periconia

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's scale for rating air quality:

Good

0-50

PM2.5 24hr Avg.

0-12.0

8-Hour Ozone Conentration

0-0.054

Cautionary
Statements

None.

Moderate

51-100

PM2.5 24hr Avg.

12.1-35.4

8-Hour Ozone Concentration

0.055-0.070

Cautionary
Statements

Unsusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.

Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups

101-150

PM2.5 24hr Avg.

35.5-55.4

8-Hour Ozone Concentration

0.071-0.085

Cautionary
Statements

People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.

Unhealthy

151-200

PM2.5 24hr Avg.

55.5-150.4

8-Hour Ozone Concentration

0.086-0.105

Cautionary
Statements

People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should avoid prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Everyone else should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.

Very Unhealthy

201-300

PM2.5 24hr Avg.

150.5-250.4

8-Hour Ozone Concentration

0.106-0.200

Cautionary
Statements

People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should avoid all outdoor exertion. Everyone else should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.

Hazardous

301-500

PM2.5 24hr Avg.

>250.5

8-Hour Ozone Concentration

>0.200

Cautionary
Statements

People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should remain indoors and keep activity levels low. Everyone else should avoid all physical activity outdoors.

The Bureau provides information about its monitoring activities in the Daily Air Quality Report, which can also be accessed by phone at (423) 643-5971.  This information includes:

  • Air Quality Index - The Air Quality Index (AQI) was designed by the EPA to provided a standardized, national method of measuring air quality.  It classifies air quality concentrations as good, moderate, unhealthy for sensitive groups, unhealthy, very unhealthy and hazardous, based on a scale of 0-500.  More information is available in EPA's Air Quality Index brochure.

In Hamilton County the daily air quality level is determined by either the ozone or particulate concentration, depending on which is higher on that day.  Since the early 1980's, most days have been in the good range.

  • Forecast - The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation's Air Pollution Control Department (TDEC) gathers information from monitors all over the state.  This information is then used to predict air quality for the next 48 hours.  The Daily Air Quality Report includes both an actual reading from the day before and a forecast for the next day, based on TDEC's prediction.

  • Burning Status - Burning is allowed in Hamilton County between October 1 and April 30 with the appropriate permits.  The burning status is determined by the predicted daily air quality and Forestry's burning safety determination.  You can also find out the day's burning status by calling the Information Line at (423) 643-5971.

  • Pollen and Mold Spore Counts - The Air Monitoring Department uses a pollen monitor to count the pollen grains and mold spores in the air.  The counts and types of pollen and mold spores are reported according to a scale that indicates the severity of the pollutant.
    • The Fall Scale for pollen is initiated when the first significant readings of grass or ragweed pollen occur on the monitors.
    • The Spring Scale is initiated at the first significant readings of hardwood pollen. 

 

Spring Pollen Scale
Low 0-30
Moderate 31-60
High 61-120
Extremely Heavy Over 120
Autumn Pollen Scale
Low 0-19
Moderate 20-29
High 30-50
Extremely Heavy Over 50
Mold Spore Scale
Low 0-899
Moderate 900-2,499
High 2,500-25,000
Extremely Heavy Over 25,000